Dianthus

Dianthus in a mixed border

Dianthus in a mixed border


Dianthus with Heuchera 'Paris'

Dianthus with Heuchera ‘Paris’


Dianthus barbatus 'Sooty'

Dianthus barbatus ‘Sooty’


Dianthus x hybridus 'Spooky with Penstemon 'Husker Red'

Dianthus x hybridus ‘Spooky with Penstemon ‘Husker Red’


White Dianthus x hybridus 'Spooky

White Dianthus x hybridus ‘Spooky


Pink Dianthus x hybridus 'Spooky

Pink Dianthus x hybridus ‘Spooky


Dianthus NOID

Dianthus NOID


Dianthus with Salvia

Dianthus with Salvia


Dianthus with Hosta and Lavandula

Dianthus with Hosta and Lavandula


Dianthus with Geranium

Dianthus with Geranium


Dianthus with conifers

Dianthus with conifers

(Under construction)
I used to think of Dianthus mostly as fillers because they are easy to sow from seeds. Over the years I came to like them as much as other ornamental perennials, and not all are in the shades of pink that I am not too crazy about. They deserve their own permanent places in my garden now.
Dianthus propagates from seeds and grows easily. Although they produce tons of seeds each season, so far, I find that they mostly self-sow in their own little patch and do not run around wildly like Forget-Me-Not. The taller varieties mostly have floppy habits. All of them look like brown patches in later summer. You can easily do one clean up by pruning off the brown tops, but if you want some self-sow babies, you better save some for seeds. If you are willing to address these shortcoming in your composition and maintenance schedule, Dianthus belongs your garden.

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