Pinus strobus

  • Pinus strobus 'Vercurve' in August

(Under construction)
Pinus strobus (common name eastern white pine) is native to my area. The soft fine needles and majestic structure make it one of the most ornamental pines in my opinion (slightly bias here).
The woods next to our property is full of these majestic pines. (Unfortunately, the original owner of our house cleared away all the trees, including the mature white pines in our lot, in order to grow tomatoes.) All the white pines in my garden are planted by us (except for the one by the pond), and are no where near as good looking as those mature specimens in the woods next to us. White pines are also flourishing around the lake where our cottage is located.

Pinus strobus ‘Contorta Pendula’

Although I cannot find any info for this plant, I will keep this name that came with it for now; its needles are contorted with somewhat weeping branches. A typical Pinus strobus ‘Contorta’ is supposed to have more upright branches.

Pinus strobus ‘Golden Candles’

This white pine has a light creamy but distinct variegation; very attractive. It is my favourite Pinus strobus.

Pinus strobus ‘Louie’

The golden colour of this white pine seems to come and go, and not particularly reliable. When the gold colour is intense, it can be quite attractive.

Pinus strobus ‘Nana’

This is probably the most common dwarf white pine in my area. It can actually grow quite large in time, but very slowly.
I have to remove a couple because of over crowding. I planted one of them in almost full shade temporarily, but it has been sitting there for many years. It does not appear to be too unhappy, but remain very small. All my plants are 20 years or more old.

Pinus strobus ‘Pendula’

This may be a very common weeping white pine, it is still as beautiful as ever. One of my Pinus strobus ‘Pendula’ is likely close to 30 years old. It was sold to be as Pinus flexilis ‘Pendula’, but has been re-identified recently as Pinus strobus ‘Pendula’. It was stakes to about 5 m high and remain self-supporting without any support. My other ‘Pendula’ appears to be not as self supporting. It was staked to about 3 m high. I am pretty sure, it will fall if I remove the support.t appears to have thicker foliage and longer needles.

Pinus strobus ‘Vercurve’

This is an interesting greyish curly foliage dwarf.

Pinus ayacahuite x strobus ‘Forest Sky’

This is an interesting hybrid between the eastern white and the Mexican pine. I love its bluish needles, and consider it highly ornamental; my best blue pine.

Pinus strobus at the cottage

Pinus strobus at the cottage


Pinus strobus next door

Pinus strobus next door

Pinus strobus 'Contorta Pendula'

Pinus strobus ‘Contorta Pendula’


Pinus strobus 'Golden Candles' (2014)

Pinus strobus ‘Golden Candles’ (2014)


Pinus strobus 'Golden Candle'

Pinus strobus ‘Golden Candle’


Pinus strobus 'Greg'

Pinus strobus ‘Greg’


Pinus strobus 'Louie' in June

Pinus strobus ‘Louie’ in June


Pinus strobus 'Louie' in August

Pinus strobus ‘Louie’ in August


Pinus strobus 'Louie' in October

Pinus strobus ‘Louie’ in October


Pinus strobus 'Louie'

Pinus strobus ‘Louie’


Pinus strobus 'Nana'

Pinus strobus ‘Nana’


Pinus strobus 'Nana'

Pinus strobus ‘Nana’


Pinus strobus 'Pendula'

Pinus strobus ‘Pendula’


Pinus strobus 'Vercurve'

Pinus strobus ‘Vercurve’


Pinus strobus x ayacahuite 'Forest Sky'

Pinus strobus x ayacahuite ‘Forest Sky’


Pinus strobus x ayacahuite 'Forest Sky'

Pinus ayacahuite x strobus ‘Forest Sky’

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