Abies koreana

  • Abies koreana 'Blauer Pfiff' in May

(Under construction)
Abies koreana (common name Korean fir) offers many attractive compact and dwarf cultivars, and is generally hardy to Zone 4. Some of them are available in Canada.

Abies koreana ‘Aurea’

A small and compact fir with soft yellow needles that last from spring into October.
It was introduced by Lohbrunner Nursery, BC.

Abies koreana ‘Black Hills’

This a dark green dwarf that would be ideal for rockery garden. Unfortunately, the voles worked so hard on mine that it did not even survive the first season.

Abies koreana ‘Blauer Eskimo’

It is supposed to be very dense and slow growing silvery blue foliage fir. My plant is still very young.
It was found by K.Wittboldt-Muller Nursery, Germany.

Abies koreana ‘Blauer Pfiff’

This is supposed to be the ‘bluest’ of the fir cultivar. My plant is in no way showing that attribute. I can only hope that it is not mis-labelled, and the colour will prevail in a few years (wishful thinking).
It was introduced by K.Wittboldt-Muller Nursery, Germany, and was obtained from seeds treated with radioactive cobalt.

Abies koreana ‘Cis’

This is a slow growing dark green compact mound. It would be a good composition element in a rockery garden.
It was from a chance seedling found by Roelvink of Groningen, Netherlands, and was name after his mother.

Abies koreana ‘Freudenberg’

This is a slow growing upright dark green fir. It would be very useful for composition in perennial beds.

Abies koreana ‘Horstmann’s Silberlocke’

This is one of the most attractive Abies koreanas, and very popular. The first plant I acquired does not show much of the characteristic white colour. My attempts to grow a second one have failed twice. It appears that this cultivar is not taking extreme heat in the summer well. I have just started on my third trial.

Abies koreana ‘Ice Breaker’

This is one of the brightest white conifer, and is very dwarf and slow growing. It was raised by Jorg Kohout of Germany, and is from a witch broom on a ‘Silverlocke’. I hope this beauty is willing to live in my garden.

Abies koreana ‘Lippetal’

I received this plant as Abies koreana ‘Wustemeyer’. However, RHS encyclopedia of Conifers indicated that ‘Wustemeyer’ is supposed to be syn. ‘Silberkugel’ which does not look like my plant. After posting on a conifer forum for help, a conifer cultivar identification expert from the Netherlands, Edwin provided a clear answer:
“…It was found by my German friend Werner Wüstemeyer and he gave it first the temporary name ‘H.B. Wüstemeyer no. 1’.
I think your Abies koreana ‘Wüstemeyer’ is a mistake for Abies koreana ‘Zwergform Wüstemeyer’ which has an upright growing habit.
‘Zwergform Wüstemeyer’ was also a temporary name for what is now Abies koreana ‘Lippetal’, named after a town in Germany.”

Abies koreana ‘Tundra’

This is another compact dark green slowing growing mound.

Abies koreana 'Aurea' in June

Abies koreana ‘Aurea’ in June


Abies koreana 'Aurea' in July

Abies koreana ‘Aurea’ in July


Abies koreana 'Aurea' in June

Abies koreana ‘Aurea’ in June


Abies koreana 'Aurea' in March

Abies koreana ‘Aurea’ in March


Abies koreana 'Blauer Eskimo' in August

Abies koreana ‘Blauer Eskimo’ in August


Abies koreana 'Blauer Pfiff' in July

Abies koreana ‘Blauer Pfiff’ in July


Abies koreana 'Cis' in August

Abies koreana ‘Cis’ in August


Abies koreana 'Cis' in October

Abies koreana ‘Cis’ in October


Abies koreana 'Freudenberg' in June

Abies koreana ‘Freudenberg’ in June


Abies koreana 'Freudenberg' in June

Abies koreana ‘Freudenberg’ in June


Abies koreana 'Gelbbunt' in July

Abies koreana ‘Gelbbunt’ in July


Abies koreana 'Horstmann's Silberlocke' in July

Abies koreana ‘Horstmann’s Silberlocke’ in July

Abies koreana 'Horstmann's Silberlocke' in October

Abies koreana ‘Horstmann’s Silberlocke’ in October

Abies koreana 'Horstmann's Silberlocke' in July

Abies koreana ‘Horstmann’s Silberlocke’ in July


Abies koreana 'Horstmann's Silberlocke' cones

Abies koreana ‘Horstmann’s Silberlocke’ cones


Abies koreana 'Ice Breaker' in August

Abies koreana ‘Ice Breaker’ in August


Abies koreana 'Ice Breaker' in August

Abies koreana ‘Ice Breaker’ in August


Abies koreana 'Tundra' in June

Abies koreana ‘Tundra’ in June


Abies koreana 'Lippetal' in July

Abies koreana ‘Lippetal’ in July


Abies koreana 'Lippetal' in July

Abies koreana ‘Lippetal’ in July


Abies koreana 'Lippetal' cones

Abies koreana ‘Lippetal’ cones

(Under construction)
Abies koreana (common name Korean fir) offers many attractive compact and dwarf cultivars, and is generally hardy to Zone 4. Some of them are available in Canada.

Abies koreana ‘Aurea’

A small and compact fir with soft yellow needles that last from spring into October.
It was introduced by Lohbrunner Nursery, BC.

Abies koreana ‘Black Hills’

This a dark green dwarf that would be ideal for rockery garden. Unfortunately, the voles worked so hard on mine that it did not even survive the first season.

Abies koreana ‘Blauer Eskimo’

It is supposed to be very dense and slow growing silvery blue foliage fir. My plant is still very young.
It was found by K.Wittboldt-Muller Nursery, Germany.

Abies koreana ‘Blauer Pfiff’

This is supposed to be the ‘bluest’ of the fir cultivar. My plant is in no way showing that attribute. I can only hope that it is not mis-labelled, and the colour will prevail in a few years (wishful thinking).
It was introduced by K.Wittboldt-Muller Nursery, Germany, and was obtained from seeds treated with radioactive cobalt.

Abies koreana ‘Cis’

This is a slow growing dark green compact mound. It would be a good composition element in a rockery garden.
It was from a chance seedling found by Roelvink of Groningen, Netherlands, and was name after his mother.

Abies koreana ‘Freudenberg’

This is a slow growing upright dark green fir. It would be very useful for composition in perennial beds.

Abies koreana ‘Horstmann’s Silberlocke’

This is one of the most attractive Abies koreanas, and very popular. The first plant I acquired does not show much of the characteristic white colour. My attempts to grow a second one have failed twice. It appears that this cultivar is not taking extreme heat in the summer well. I have just started on my third trial.

Abies koreana ‘Ice Breaker’

This is one of the brightest white conifer, and is very dwarf and slow growing. It was raised by Jorg Kohout of Germany, and is from a witch broom on a ‘Silverlocke’. I hope this beauty is willing to live in my garden.

Abies koreana ‘Lippetal’

I received this plant as Abies koreana ‘Wustemeyer’. However, RHS encyclopedia of Conifers indicated that ‘Wustemeyer’ is supposed to be syn. ‘Silberkugel’ which does not look like my plant. After posting on a conifer forum for help, a conifer cultivar identification expert from the Netherlands, Edwin provided a clear answer:
“…It was found by my German friend Werner Wüstemeyer and he gave it first the temporary name ‘H.B. Wüstemeyer no. 1’.
I think your Abies koreana ‘Wüstemeyer’ is a mistake for Abies koreana ‘Zwergform Wüstemeyer’ which has an upright growing habit.
‘Zwergform Wüstemeyer’ was also a temporary name for what is now Abies koreana ‘Lippetal’, named after a town in Germany.”

Abies koreana ‘Tundra’

This is another compact dark green slowing growing mound.

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